Cementitious Spray Dryer Ash-Tire Fiber Material for Maximizing Waste Diversion

Advances in Civil Engineering. 2011;2011 DOI 10.1155/2011/354305

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Advances in Civil Engineering

ISSN: 1687-8086 (Print); 1687-8094 (Online)

Publisher: Hindawi Publishing Corporation

LCC Subject Category: Technology: Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General)

Country of publisher: Egypt

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML, ePUB, XML

 

AUTHORS

Charles E. Riley (Department of Civil Engineering, Oregon Institute of Technology, 3201 Campus Drive, Klamath Falls, OR 97601, USA)
Rebecca A. Atadero (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University, Campus Delivery 1372, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1372, USA)
John W. van de Lindt (Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0205, USA)
Paul R. Heyliger (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University, Campus Delivery 1372, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1372, USA)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 15 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Spray dryer absorber (SDA) material, also known as spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of coal combustion and flue gas scrubbing processes that has self-cementing properties similar to those of class C fly ash. SDA material does not usually meet the existing standards for use as a pozzolan in Portland cement concrete due to its characteristically high sulfur content, and thus unlike fly ash, it is rarely put to beneficial use. This paper presents the results of a study with the objective of developing beneficial uses for SDA material in building materials when combined with tire fiber reinforcement originating from a recycling process. Specifically, spray dryer ash was investigated for use as the primary or even the sole binding component in a mortar or concrete. This study differs from previous research in that it focuses on very high contents of spray dryer ash (80 to 100 percent) in a hardened product. The overarching objective is to divert products that are normally sent to landfills and provide benefit to society in beneficial applications.