Twenty-Year Summary of Surveillance for Human Hantavirus Infections, United States

Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(12):1934-1937 DOI 10.3201/eid1912.131217

 

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Journal Title: Emerging Infectious Diseases

ISSN: 1080-6040 (Print); 1080-6059 (Online)

Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

LCC Subject Category: Medicine: Internal medicine: Infectious and parasitic diseases

Country of publisher: United States

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML, XML, print

 

AUTHORS

Barbara Knust
Pierre E. Rollin

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 8 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

In the past 20 years of surveillance for hantavirus in humans in the United States, 624 cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) have been reported, 96% of which occurred in states west of the Mississippi River. Most hantavirus infections are caused by Sin Nombre virus, but cases of HPS caused by Bayou, Black Creek Canal, Monongahela, and New York viruses have been reported, and cases of domestically acquired hemorrhagic fever and renal syndrome caused by Seoul virus have also occurred. Rarely, hantavirus infections result in mild illness that does not progress to HPS. Continued testing and surveillance of clinical cases in humans will improve our understanding of the etiologic agents involved and the spectrum of diseases.