POLICE BODY CAMERAS: SEEING MAY BE BELIEVING

Salus Journal. 2016;4(3):49-64

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Salus Journal

ISSN: 2202-5677 (Online)

Publisher: Charles Sturt University

LCC Subject Category: General Works

Country of publisher: Australia

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF

 

AUTHORS

Noel Otu (University of Texas)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Double blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 12 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

While the concept of body-mounted cameras (BMC) worn by police officers is a controversial issue, it is not new. Since in the early-2000s, police departments across the United States, England, Brazil, and Australia have been implementing wearable cameras. Like all devices used in policing, body-mounted cameras can create a sense of increased power, but also additional responsibilities for both the agencies and individual officers. This paper examines the public debate regarding body-mounted cameras. The conclusions drawn show that while these devices can provide information about incidents relating to police–citizen encounters, and can deter citizen and police misbehavior, these devices can also violate a citizen’s privacy rights. This paper outlines several ramifications for practice as well as implications for policy.