One-stage reconstruction of soft tissue defects with the sandwich technique: Collagen-elastin dermal template and skin grafts

Journal of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery. 2011;4(3):176-182 DOI 10.4103/0974-2077.91248

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Journal of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery

ISSN: 0974-2077 (Print); 0974-5157 (Online)

Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Medknow Publications

Society/Institution: Association of Cutaneous Surgeons of India

LCC Subject Category: Medicine: Surgery

Country of publisher: India

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML, ePUB

 

AUTHORS

Uwe Wollina

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 29 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Background : A full-thickness soft tissue defect closure often needs complex procedures. The use of dermal templates can be helpful in improving the outcome. Objective : The objective was to evaluate a sandwich technique combining the dermal collagen-elastin matrix with skin grafts in a one-stage procedure. Materials and Methods : Twenty-three patients with 27 wounds were enrolled in this prospective single-centre observational study. The mean age was 74.8 ± 17.2 years. Included were full-thickness defects with exposed bone, cartilage and/ or tendons. The dermal collagen-elastin matrix was applied onto the wound bed accomplished by skin transplants, i.e. ′sandwich′ transplantation. In six wounds, the transplants were treated with intermittent negative pressure therapy. Results : The size of defects was ≤875 cm 2 . The use of the dermal template resulted in a complete and stable granulation in 100% of wounds. Seventeen defects showed a complete closure and 19 achieved a complete granulation with an incomplete closure. There was a marked pain relief. No adverse events were noted due to the dermal template usage. Conclusions : Sandwich transplantation with the collagen-elastin matrix is a useful tool when dealing with full-thickness soft tissue defects with exposed bone, cartilage or tendons.