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Kidney Discard Rates in the United States During American Transplant Congress Meetings

Transplantation Direct. 2019;5(1):e412 DOI 10.1097/TXD.0000000000000849

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Transplantation Direct

ISSN: 2373-8731 (Online)

Publisher: Wolters Kluwer

Society/Institution: The Transplantation Society

LCC Subject Category: Medicine: Surgery

Country of publisher: United States

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML, ePUB

 

AUTHORS


Dina Abdelwahab Elhamahmi, MD, FRCP (1 Transplant Center, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, AZ.)

Thomas Chaly, Jr, MD (2 Department of Surgery, Division of Transplantation and Advanced Hepatobiliary Surgery, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT.)

Guo Wei, MS (3 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT.)

Isaac E. Hall, MD, MS (3 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT.)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 8 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Background. Deceased-donor kidney discard rates vary by region, but it is unknown whether discard rates and transplant outcomes vary during the American Transplant Congress (ATC) each year. Methods. Using national registry data, we determined rates of kidney discard, delayed graft function, graft failure, and mortality from December 31, 1999, through December 30, 2015, during ATC dates and compared these rates with those on the same days of the week during the 2 weeks before and after the ATC (non-ATC). We used multivariable regression to determine associations between ATC and these outcomes. Results. From 7902 donors (1575 ATC; 6327 non-ATC), 12 588 recipients received kidney transplants (2455 ATC; 10 133 non-ATC), and 2666 kidneys were discarded (582 ATC; 2084 non-ATC). Kidneys were more often discarded during ATC (19% vs 17%, P = 0.006; adjusted odds ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.40). There were no significant differences in donor, transplant, or recipient characteristics by ATC/non-ATC dates or by ATC/non-ATC transplant dates for delayed graft function, graft failure, or mortality. Conclusions. On the basis of a 21% increased odds of discard, the ATC itself may result in 5 additional kidney discards during this important conference every year, which suggests the need for innovative staffing or other logistic solutions during these planned meetings.