Comparative analysis of mitochondrial genomes of geographic variants of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, reveals a previously undescribed genotypic entity

Scientific Reports. 2017;7(1):1-12 DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-14530-6

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Scientific Reports

ISSN: 2045-2322 (Online)

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

LCC Subject Category: Medicine | Science

Country of publisher: United Kingdom

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML

 

AUTHORS

Abdelmadjid Djoumad (Laurentian Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, 1055 rue du PEPS, Quebec City)
Audrey Nisole (Laurentian Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, 1055 rue du PEPS, Quebec City)
Reza Zahiri (Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa Plant Laboratory, Entomology Unit, Ottawa)
Luca Freschi (Institute for Integrative and System Biology, 1030 Avenue de la Médecine, Université Laval, Quebec City)
Sandrine Picq (Laurentian Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, 1055 rue du PEPS, Quebec City)
Dawn E. Gundersen-Rindal (United States Department of Agriculture - ARS Invasive Insect Biocontrol and Behavior Laboratory)
Michael E. Sparks (United States Department of Agriculture - ARS Invasive Insect Biocontrol and Behavior Laboratory)
Ken Dewar (McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, 740 Dr. Penfield Avenue Rm 7104, Montreal)
Don Stewart (Laurentian Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, 1055 rue du PEPS, Quebec City)
Halim Maaroufi (Institute for Integrative and System Biology, 1030 Avenue de la Médecine, Université Laval, Quebec City)
Roger C. Levesque (Institute for Integrative and System Biology, 1030 Avenue de la Médecine, Université Laval, Quebec City)
Richard C. Hamelin (Institute for Integrative and System Biology, 1030 Avenue de la Médecine, Université Laval, Quebec City)
Michel Cusson (Laurentian Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, 1055 rue du PEPS, Quebec City)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 20 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Abstract The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar L., is one of the most destructive forest pests in the world. While the subspecies established in North America is the European gypsy moth (L. dispar dispar), whose females are flightless, the two Asian subspecies, L. dispar asiatica and L. dispar japonica, have flight-capable females, enhancing their invasiveness and warranting precautionary measures to prevent their permanent establishment in North America. Various molecular tools have been developed to help distinguish European from Asian subspecies, several of which are based on the mitochondrial barcode region. In an effort to identify additional informative markers, we undertook the sequencing and analysis of the mitogenomes of 10 geographic variants of L. dispar, including two or more variants of each subspecies, plus the closely related L. umbrosa as outgroup. Several regions of the gypsy moth mitogenomes displayed nucleotide substitutions with potential usefulness for the identification of subspecies and/or geographic origins. Interestingly, the mitogenome of one geographic variant displayed significant divergence relative to the remaining variants, raising questions about its taxonomic status. Phylogenetic analyses placed this population from northern Iran as basal to the L. dispar clades. The present findings will help improve diagnostic tests aimed at limiting risks of AGM invasions.