Carbon dioxide emissions embodied in international trade in Central Europe between 1995 and 2008

Moravian Geographical Reports. 2015;23(4):2-13 DOI 10.1515/mgr-2015-0020

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Moravian Geographical Reports

ISSN: 1210-8812 (Print); 2199-6202 (Online)

Publisher: Sciendo

Society/Institution: Institute of Geonics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic

LCC Subject Category: Geography. Anthropology. Recreation: Geography (General)

Country of publisher: Poland

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF

 

AUTHORS

Vlčková Jana (Department of World Economy, Faculty of International Relations of the University of Economics, Prague, Czech Republic)
Nosek Vojtěch (Department of Social Geography and Regional Development, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic)
Novotný Josef (Department of Social Geography and Regional Development, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic)
Lupíšek Antonín (University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings, Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 40 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Climate change and environmental policies are widely discussed, but much less is known about emissions embodied in goods traded internationally, and the distinction between emission producers and consumers. The carbon dioxide emissions embodied in international trade in Central European countries are subject to examination in this paper. As a result of industrial restructuring and environmental legislation, air pollution has improved significantly in Central European countries since the 1989 transition. On the other hand, economic growth has been accompanied by a rise in consumerism. Despite the increasing role of exports, the Visegrad group countries have become net importers of carbon dioxide emissions between 1995 and 2008. This seems to be the ‘standard trajectory’ of a country’s transition toward a more developed and consumption-oriented economy. The global patterns of carbon dioxide emissions embodied in manufacturing exports are also mapped, using network analysis and constructing ‘product space’. The analysis confirms that industrial re-structuring played an important role in lowering the production of carbon dioxide emissions in the Visegrad countries.