Habitual snoring and primary enuresis in children

Paediatrica Indonesiana. 2018;58(3):116-22 DOI 10.14238/pi58.3.2018.116-22

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Paediatrica Indonesiana

ISSN: 0030-9311 (Print); 2338-476X (Online)

Publisher: Indonesian Pediatric Society Publishing House

Society/Institution: Indonesian Pediatric Society

LCC Subject Category: Medicine: Pediatrics

Country of publisher: Indonesia

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF

 

AUTHORS

Muhammad Adib Mahara (Department of Child Health, University of Sumatera Utara Medical School/H. Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, North Sumatera)
Oke Rina Ramayani (Department of Child Health, University of Sumatera Utara Medical School/H. Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, North Sumatera)
Elmeida Effendy (Department of Psychiatry, University of Sumatera Utara Medical School/H. Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, North Sumatera)
Munar Lubis (Department of Child Health, University of Sumatera Utara Medical School/H. Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, North Sumatera)
Rosmayanti Siregar (Department of Child Health, University of Sumatera Utara Medical School/H. Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, North Sumatera)
Beatrix Siregar (Department of Child Health, University of Sumatera Utara Medical School/H. Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, North Sumatera)
Rafita Ramayanti (Department of Child Health, University of Sumatera Utara Medical School/H. Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, North Sumatera)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Peer review

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Time From Submission to Publication: 24 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Background Obstructive sleep-disordered breathing is assumed to be associated with primary enuresis in children. Prolonged enuresis may cause developmental and emotional disorders, as well as poor school performance. Objective To determine the relationship between habitual snoring and primary enuresis in children. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Muara Batang Gadis District, North Sumatera in April 2016. Subjects were children aged 5-14 years. The Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC) questionnaire was used to measure the symptoms of sleep disordered breathing; the International Association Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions (IACAPAP) questionnaire was used to assess for the presence of primary enuresis. The questionnaires were answered by the children’s parents. Data were analyzed using Chi-square and logistic regression tests. A P value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results The mean age of 110 participants was 9.23 (SD 2.16) years. Twenty-seven (24.5%) subjects snored more than three nights per week (habitual snorers) and 18 (16.4%) subjects had primary enuresis. There was a significantly higher percentage of habitual snorers with enuresis than that of snorers without enuresis (55.5% vs. 18.4%, respectively) (P<0.05). Conclusion There is a significant relationship between habitual snoring and primary enuresis.