Associations between Aspects of Friendship Networks, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behaviour among Adolescents

Journal of Obesity. 2014;2014 DOI 10.1155/2014/632689

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Journal of Obesity

ISSN: 2090-0708 (Print); 2090-0716 (Online)

Publisher: Hindawi Limited

LCC Subject Category: Medicine: Internal medicine

Country of publisher: United Kingdom

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML, ePUB, XML

 

AUTHORS

Keri Jo Sawka (University of Calgary, Teaching Research and Wellness Building, 3rd Floor, 3280 Hospital, Drive NW, AB, T2N 4Z6, Canada)
Gavin R. McCormack (University of Calgary, Teaching Research and Wellness Building, 3rd Floor, 3280 Hospital, Drive NW, AB, T2N 4Z6, Canada)
Alberto Nettel-Aguirre (Alberta Children’s Hospital, Room C4-435, 2888 Shaganappi, Trail NW, Calgary, AB, T3B 6A8, Canada)
Anita Blackstaffe (University of Calgary, Teaching Research and Wellness Building, 3rd Floor, 3280 Hospital, Drive NW, AB, T2N 4Z6, Canada)
Rosemary Perry (University of Calgary, Teaching Research and Wellness Building, 3rd Floor, 3280 Hospital, Drive NW, AB, T2N 4Z6, Canada)
Penelope Hawe (University of Calgary, Teaching Research and Wellness Building, 3rd Floor, 3280 Hospital, Drive NW, AB, T2N 4Z6, Canada)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 21 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Background. Adolescent friendships have been linked to physical activity levels; however, network characteristics have not been broadly examined. Method. In a cross-sectional analysis of 1061 adolescents (11–15 years), achieving 60 minutes/day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and participating in over 2 hours/day of sedentary behaviour were determined based on friendship network characteristics (density; proportion of active/sedentary friends; betweenness centrality; popularity; clique membership) and perceived social support. Results. Adolescents with no friendship nominations participated in less MVPA. For boys and girls, a ten percent point increase in active friends was positively associated with achievement of 60 minutes/day of MVPA (OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.02–1.21, OR 1.14; 95% CI 1.02–1.27, resp.). For boys, higher social support from friends was negatively associated with achieving 60 minutes/day of MVPA (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42–0.96). Compared with low density networks, boys in higher density networks were more likely to participate in over 2 hours/day of sedentary behaviour (OR 2.93; 95% CI 1.32–6.49). Social support from friends also modified associations between network characteristics and MVPA and sedentary behaviour. Conclusion. Different network characteristics appeared to have different consequences. The proportion of active close friends was associated with MVPA, while network density was associated with sedentary behaviour. This poses challenges for intervention design.