A controlled aquarium system and approach to study the role of sponge-bacteria interactions using Aplysilla rosea and Vibrio natriegens

Scientific Reports. 2018;8(1):1-11 DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-30295-y

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Scientific Reports

ISSN: 2045-2322 (Online)

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

LCC Subject Category: Medicine | Science

Country of publisher: United Kingdom

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML

 

AUTHORS

Mohammad F. Mehbub (Centre for Marine Bioproducts Development, College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University)
Jason E. Tanner (Centre for Marine Bioproducts Development, College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University)
Stephen J. Barnett (Medical Biotechnology, College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University)
Jan Bekker (Centre for Marine Bioproducts Development, College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University)
Christopher M. M. Franco (Centre for Marine Bioproducts Development, College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University)
Wei Zhang (Centre for Marine Bioproducts Development, College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 20 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Abstract Sponge-bacteria interactions are very important due to their ecological and biological significance. To understand the impact of interactions between sponges and bacteria (both associated with and external to sponges) on sponge-associated microbial diversity, sponge metabolite profiles and bioactivity, we used a controlled aquarium system and designed an experimental approach that allows the study of sponge-bacteria interactions in a well-defined manner. To test the feasibility of this approach, this system was used to study the interaction between a sponge Aplysilla rosea and a marine bacterium commonly found in seawater, Vibrio natriegens. Sponge explants were exposed to V. natriegens, at 5 × 106 cfu/ml, and changes were monitored for 48 hours. Pyro-sequencing revealed significant shifts in microbial communities associated with the sponges after 24 to 48 hours. Both the control (sponge only without added bacteria) and Vibrio-exposed sponges showed a distinct shift in bacterial diversity and abundance with time. Vibrio exposure significantly increased bacterial diversity, the abundance of a number of taxa compared to control sponges. The result experimentally supports the notion of dynamic and concerted responses by the sponge when interacting with a bacterium, and demonstrates the feasibility of using this controlled aquarium system for the study of sponge-bacteria interactions.