Chronic Migraine: Burden, Comorbidities and Treatment

Türk Nöroloji Dergisi. 2018;24(2):117-125 DOI 10.4274/tnd.55563

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Türk Nöroloji Dergisi

ISSN: 1301-062X (Print); 1309-2545 (Online)

Publisher: Galenos Yayinevi

LCC Subject Category: Medicine: Internal medicine: Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry: Neurology. Diseases of the nervous system

Country of publisher: Turkey

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF

 

AUTHORS


Aynur Özge (Mersin University School of Medicine, Neurology Department, Mersin, Turkey)

Derya Uludüz (İstanbul University Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Neurology Department,İstanbul, Turkey)

Osman Özgür Yalın (Health Sciences University, Istanbul Training and Research Hospital, Clinic of Neurology, Istanbul, Turkey)

Seden Demirci (Isparta Süleyman Demirel University School of Medicine, Neurology Department, Isparta, Turkey)

Ömer Karadaş (University of Health Sciences, Gulhane Training and Research Hospital, Clinic of Neurology, Ankara, Turkey)

Uğur Uygunoğlu (İstanbul University Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Neurology Department,İstanbul, Turkey)

Aksel Siva (İstanbul University Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Neurology Department,İstanbul, Turkey)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Double blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 12 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Chronic migraine (CM) is defined as headache occurring on 15 or more days per month for more than three months, which, on at least 8 days per month, has the features of migraine headache. In the International Classification of Headache Disorders, CM is defined as a separate entity and the presence of drug overuse headache is removed from being an exclusion criterion. CM accounts for more than 10% of all migraine patients and includes the group with the most prominent disease-related disability. Diagnosis is often overlooked and most patients do not receive appropriate treatment. CM is associated with social and economic burdens such as frequent use of health services, drug overuse, and significant disruption to work and school life. Compared with episodic migraine, more frequent comorbid disorders are important in migraine chronicity, treatment, and course. With appropriate treatment in CM, it is possible to increase the quality of life of the patient and to reduce the social economic burden associated with migraine. In this review, the disease burden of CM, accompanying comorbid diseases, and current treatment options are reviewed.