Carbon stocks in tree biomass and soils of German forests

Central European Forestry Journal. 2017;63(2-3):105-112 DOI 10.1515/forj-2017-0013

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Central European Forestry Journal

ISSN: 2454-0358 (Online)

Publisher: Sciendo

Society/Institution: National Forest Centre – Forest Research Institute Zvolen

LCC Subject Category: Agriculture: Forestry

Country of publisher: Poland

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF

 

AUTHORS

Wellbrock Nicole (Thünen Institute of Forest Ecosystems Alfred-Möller-Str. 1, Haus 41/42, 16225 Eberswalde, Germany)
Grüneberg Erik (Thünen Institute of Forest Ecosystems Alfred-Möller-Str. 1, Haus 41/42, 16225 Eberswalde, Germany)
Riedel Thomas (Thünen Institute of Forest Ecosystems Alfred-Möller-Str. 1, Haus 41/42, 16225 Eberswalde, Germany)
Polley Heino (Thünen Institute of Forest Ecosystems Alfred-Möller-Str. 1, Haus 41/42, 16225 Eberswalde, Germany)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Double blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 22 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Close to one third of Germany is forested. Forests are able to store significant quantities of carbon (C) in the biomass and in the soil. Coordinated by the Thünen Institute, the German National Forest Inventory (NFI) and the National Forest Soil Inventory (NFSI) have generated data to estimate the carbon storage capacity of forests. The second NFI started in 2002 and had been repeated in 2012. The reporting time for the NFSI was 1990 to 2006. Living forest biomass, deadwood, litter and soils up to a depth of 90 cm have stored 2500 t of carbon within the reporting time. Over all 224 t C ha-1 in aboveground and belowground biomass, deadwood and soil are stored in forests. Specifically, 46% stored in above-ground and below-ground biomass, 1% in dead wood and 53% in the organic layer together with soil up to 90 cm. Carbon stocks in mineral soils up to 30 cm mineral soil increase about 0.4 t C ha-1 yr-1 stocks between the inventories while the carbon pool in the organic layers declined slightly. In the living biomass carbon stocks increased about 1.0 t C ha-1 yr-1. In Germany, approximately 58 mill. tonnes of CO2 were sequestered in 2012 (NIR 2017).