Dose-Response of High-Intensity Training (HIT) on Atheroprotective miRNA-126 Levels

Frontiers in Physiology. 2017;8 DOI 10.3389/fphys.2017.00349

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Frontiers in Physiology

ISSN: 1664-042X (Online)

Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.

LCC Subject Category: Science: Physiology

Country of publisher: Switzerland

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML, ePUB, XML

 

AUTHORS


Boris Schmitz (Institute of Sports Medicine, Molecular Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease, University Hospital MuensterMuenster, Germany)

Katrin Schelleckes (Internal Medicine D, Nephrology, Hypertension and Rheumatology, University Hospital MuensterMuenster, Germany)

Johanna Nedele (Internal Medicine D, Nephrology, Hypertension and Rheumatology, University Hospital MuensterMuenster, Germany)

Lothar Thorwesten (Institute of Sports Medicine, Molecular Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease, University Hospital MuensterMuenster, Germany)

Andreas Klose (Department of Physical Education and Sports History, University of MuensterMuenster, Germany)

Malte Lenders (Internal Medicine D, Nephrology, Hypertension and Rheumatology, University Hospital MuensterMuenster, Germany)

Michael Krüger (Department of Physical Education and Sports History, University of MuensterMuenster, Germany)

Eva Brand (Internal Medicine D, Nephrology, Hypertension and Rheumatology, University Hospital MuensterMuenster, Germany)

Stefan-Martin Brand (Institute of Sports Medicine, Molecular Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease, University Hospital MuensterMuenster, Germany)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 14 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Aim: MicroRNA-126 (miR-126) exerts beneficial effects on vascular integrity, angiogenesis, and atherosclerotic plaque stability. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the dose-response relationship of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on miR-126-3p and -5p levels.Methods: Sixty-one moderately trained individuals (females = 31 [50.8%]; 22.0 ± 1.84 years) were consecutively recruited and allocated into three matched groups using exercise capacity. During a 4-week intervention a HIIT group performed three exercise sessions/week of 4 × 30 s at maximum speed (all-out), a progressive HIIT (proHIIT) group performed three exercise sessions/week of 4 × 30 s at maximum speed (all-out) with one extra session every week (up to 7 × 30 s) and a low-intensity training (LIT) control group performed three exercise sessions/week for 25 min <75% of maximum heart rate. Exercise miR-126-3p/-5p plasma levels were determined using capillary blood from earlobes.Results: No exercise-induced increase in miR-126 levels was detected at baseline, neither in the LIT (after 25 min low-intensity running) nor the HIIT groups (after 4 min of high-intensity running). After the intervention, the LIT group presented an increase in miR-126-3p, while in the HIIT group, miR-126-3p levels were still reduced (all p < 0.05). An increase for both, miR-126-3p and -5p levels (all p < 0.05, pre- vs. during and post-exercise) was detected in the proHIIT group. Between group analysis revealed that miR-126-3p levels after LIT and proHIIT increased by 2.12 ± 2.55 and 1.24 ± 2.46 units (all p < 0.01), respectively, compared to HIIT (−1.05 ± 2.6 units).Conclusions: LIT and proHIIT may be performed to increase individual miR-126 levels. HIIT without progression was less effective in increasing miR-126.