Lucerne transient streak virus; a Recently Detected Virus Infecting Alfafa (Medicago sativa) in Central Saudi Arabia

The Plant Pathology Journal. 2017;33(1):43-52 DOI 10.5423/PPJ.OA.06.2016.0143

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: The Plant Pathology Journal

ISSN: 1598-2254 (Print); 2093-9280 (Online)

Publisher: Hanrimwon Publishing Company

Society/Institution: Korean Society of Plant Pathology

LCC Subject Category: Agriculture: Plant culture

Country of publisher: Korea, Republic of

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML, XML

 

AUTHORS


Ahmed Raza (Department of Plant Protection, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia)

Ibrahim M. Al-Shahwan (Department of Plant Protection, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia)

Omer A. Abdalla (Department of Plant Protection, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia)

Mohammed A. Al-Saleh (Department of Plant Protection, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia)

Mahmoud A. Amer (Department of Plant Protection, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 18 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

A survey was conducted to determine the status of Lucerne transient streak virus (LTSV) in three high-yielding alfalfa regions in central Saudi Arabia (Riyadh, Qassim, and Hail) during 2014. Three hundred and eight symptomatic alfalfa, and seven Sonchus oleraceus samples were collected. DAS-ELISA indicated that 59 of these samples were positive to LTSV. Two isolates of LTSV from each region were selected for molecular studies. RT-PCR confirmed the presence of LTSV in the selected samples using a specific primer pair. Percentage identity and homology tree comparisons revealed that all Saudi isolates were more closely related to each other but also closely related to the Canadian isolate-JQ782213 (97.1–97.6%) and the New Zealand isolate-U31286 (95.8–97.1%). Comparing Saudi isolates of LTSV with ten other sobemoviruses based on the coat protein gene sequences confirmed the distant relationship between them. Eleven out of fourteen plant species used in host range study were positive to LTSV. This is the first time to document that Trifolium alexandrinum, Nicotiana occidentalis, Chenopodium glaucum, and Lathyrus sativus are new host plant species for LTSV and that N. occidentalis being a good propagative host for it.