Physicochemical Stability, Antioxidant Activity, and Acceptance of Beet and Orange Mixed Juice During Refrigerated Storage

Beverages. 2017;3(3):36 DOI 10.3390/beverages3030036

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Beverages

ISSN: 2306-5710 (Online)

Publisher: MDPI AG

LCC Subject Category: Technology: Home economics: Nutrition. Foods and food supply | Medicine: Internal medicine: Specialties of internal medicine: Nutritional diseases. Deficiency diseases

Country of publisher: Switzerland

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML, XML

 

AUTHORS

Maria Rita A. Porto (Departamento de Ciência e Tecnologia de Alimentos, Centro de Ciências Agrárias, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina 10011, Paraná, Brazil)
Vivian S. Okina (Departamento de Ciência e Tecnologia de Alimentos, Centro de Ciências Agrárias, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina 10011, Paraná, Brazil)
Tatiana C. Pimentel (Instituto Federal do Paraná, Rua José Felipe Tequinha 1400, 87703-536 Paranavaí, Paraná, Brazil)
Sandra Helena Prudencio (Departamento de Ciência e Tecnologia de Alimentos, Centro de Ciências Agrárias, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina 10011, Paraná, Brazil)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 11 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

The objective of this study was to mix beet juice and orange juice in two proportions (1:1 and 1:2 v/v), evaluate their physicochemical stability and antioxidant activity during storage (4 °C for 30 days), and evaluate their acceptance by consumers. Beet juice (with or without pasteurization) and pasteurized orange juice were used as controls. The presence of orange juice contributed to the pH, betacyanin, betaxanthin, and antioxidant capacity stabilities during storage, whereas the presence of beet improved the color stability. The mixed juices showed high total phenolic compounds (484–485 µg gallic acid/mL), DPPH scavenging capacity (2083–1930 µg Trolox/mL), and ABTS (1854–1840 µg Trolox/mL), as well as better sensory acceptance than the pasteurized beet juice. However, the mixed juices had a more significant reduction in the ascorbic acid content (completely lost at 15 days of storage) than the pasteurized orange juice (25% reduction at 30 days). The beet and orange mixed juice is an alternative functional beverage that can contribute to an increase in the consumption of beet and orange.