Chemical and optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols in Nanjing, eastern China: regionally transported biomass burning contribution

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. 2019;19:11213-11233 DOI 10.5194/acp-19-11213-2019

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

ISSN: 1680-7316 (Print); 1680-7324 (Online)

Publisher: Copernicus Publications

Society/Institution: European Geosciences Union (EGU)

LCC Subject Category: Science: Physics | Science: Chemistry

Country of publisher: Germany

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, XML

 

AUTHORS


X. Liu (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

X. Liu (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

X. Liu (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

X. Liu (School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven 06511, USA)

Y.-L. Zhang (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

Y.-L. Zhang (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

Y.-L. Zhang (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

Y. Peng (Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China)

Y. Peng (Joint Center for Global Change Studies (JCGCS), Beijing 100084, China)

L. Xu (Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China)

L. Xu (Joint Center for Global Change Studies (JCGCS), Beijing 100084, China)

C. Zhu (Research Institute for Global Change, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Yokohama 236-0001, Japan)

F. Cao (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

F. Cao (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

F. Cao (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

X. Zhai (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

X. Zhai (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

X. Zhai (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

M. M. Haque (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

M. M. Haque (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

M. M. Haque (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

C. Yang (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

C. Yang (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

C. Yang (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

Y. Chang (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

Y. Chang (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

Y. Chang (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

T. Huang (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

T. Huang (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

T. Huang (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

Z. Xu (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

Z. Xu (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

Z. Xu (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

M. Bao (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

M. Bao (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

M. Bao (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

W. Zhang (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

W. Zhang (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

W. Zhang (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

M. Fan (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

M. Fan (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

M. Fan (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

X. Lee (Yale-NUIST Center on Atmospheric Environment, Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

X. Lee (Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

X. Lee (School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China)

X. Lee (School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven 06511, USA)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Peer review

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Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 16 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

<p>Biomass burning can significantly impact the chemical and optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols. Here, the biomass burning impacts were studied during wintertime in a megacity of Nanjing, eastern China. The high abundance of biomass burning tracers such as levoglucosan (lev), mannosan (man), galactosan (gal) and non-sea-salt potassium (nss-<span class="inline-formula">K<sup>+</sup></span>) was found during the studied period with the concentration ranges of 22.4–1476&thinsp;ng&thinsp;m<span class="inline-formula"><sup>−3</sup></span>, 2.1–56.2&thinsp;ng&thinsp;m<span class="inline-formula"><sup>−3</sup></span>, 1.4–32.2&thinsp;ng&thinsp;m<span class="inline-formula"><sup>−3</sup></span> and 0.2–3.8&thinsp;<span class="inline-formula">µ</span>g&thinsp;m<span class="inline-formula"><sup>−3</sup></span>, respectively. The significant contribution of biomass burning to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC; <span class="inline-formula">22.3±9.9</span>&thinsp;%) and organic carbon (OC; <span class="inline-formula">20.9±9.3</span>&thinsp;%) was observed in this study. Backward air mass origin analysis, potential emission sensitivity of elemental carbon (EC) and MODIS fire spot information indicated that the elevations of the carbonaceous aerosols were due to the transported biomass-burning aerosols from southeastern China. The characteristic mass ratio maps of <span class="inline-formula">lev∕man</span> and <span class="inline-formula">lev∕nss</span>-<span class="inline-formula">K<sup>+</sup></span> suggested that the biomass fuels were mainly crop residuals. Furthermore, the strong correlation (<span class="inline-formula"><i>p</i> <i>&lt;</i> 0.01</span>) between biomass burning tracers (such as lev) and light absorption coefficient (<span class="inline-formula"><i>b</i><sub>abs</sub></span>) for water-soluble brown carbon (BrC) revealed that biomass burning emissions played a significant role in the light-absorption properties of carbonaceous aerosols. The solar energy absorption due to water-soluble brown carbon and EC was estimated by a calculation based on measured light-absorbing parameters and a simulation based on a radiative transfer model (RRTMG_SW). The solar energy absorption of water-soluble BrC in short wavelengths (300–400&thinsp;nm) was <span class="inline-formula">0.8±0.4</span> (0.2–2.3)&thinsp;W&thinsp;m<span class="inline-formula"><sup>−2</sup></span> (figures in parentheses represent the variation range of each parameter) from the calculation and <span class="inline-formula">1.2±0.5</span> (0.3–1.9)&thinsp;W&thinsp;m<span class="inline-formula"><sup>−2</sup></span> from the RRTMG_SW model. The absorption capacity of water-soluble BrC accounted for about 20&thinsp;%–30&thinsp;% of the total absorption of EC aerosols. The solar energy absorption of water-soluble BrC due to biomass burning was estimated as <span class="inline-formula">0.2±0.1</span> (0.0–0.9)&thinsp;W&thinsp;m<span class="inline-formula"><sup>−2</sup></span>, considering the biomass burning contribution to carbonaceous aerosols. Potential source contribution function model<span id="page11214"/> simulations showed that the solar energy absorption induced by water-soluble BrC and EC aerosols was mostly due to the regionally transported carbonaceous aerosols from source regions such as southeastern China. Our results illustrate the importance of the absorbing water-soluble brown carbon aerosols in trapping additional solar energy in the low-level atmosphere, heating the surface and inhibiting the energy from escaping the atmosphere.</p>