Homophobia in Marlowe’s Edward II Homophobia in Marlowe’s Edward II

Ilha do Desterro. 2008;0(34):105-112

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Ilha do Desterro

ISSN: 0101-4846 (Print); 2175-8026 (Online)

Publisher: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

LCC Subject Category: Language and Literature: English literature

Country of publisher: Brazil

Language of fulltext: English, Portuguese

Full-text formats available: PDF

 

AUTHORS

Gelson Peres de Silva

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Double blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 16 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Drawing on queer theory, this essay demonstrates how
 homophobia motivates the plot of usurpation in Edward II, by
 Chistopher Marlowe (1564-1593), a play in which complex power relations can be verified. The main characters, King Edward II, Pierce of Gaveston, Mortimer Junior, Mortimer Senior and Queen Isabella, together with the nobles and the clerics, interact in a world of fierce political dispute. Power relations are at the core of the play and involve,
 on the one hand, the characters who envy and dispute Edward II’s royal power. On the other hand, the king suffers the effects of the power of his own homosexual drive and affective ties with Gaveston. Drawing on queer theory, this essay demonstrates how
 homophobia motivates the plot of usurpation in Edward II, by
 Chistopher Marlowe (1564-1593), a play in which complex power relations can be verified. The main characters, King Edward II, Pierce of Gaveston, Mortimer Junior, Mortimer Senior and Queen Isabella, together with the nobles and the clerics, interact in a world of fierce political dispute. Power relations are at the core of the play and involve,
 on the one hand, the characters who envy and dispute Edward II’s royal power. On the other hand, the king suffers the effects of the power of his own homosexual drive and affective ties with Gaveston.