Child and adolescent bicycling injuries involving motor vehicle collisions

Injury Epidemiology. 2019;6(1):1-7 DOI 10.1186/s40621-019-0185-z

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Injury Epidemiology

ISSN: 2197-1714 (Online)

Publisher: SpringerOpen

Society/Institution: Columbia University Center for Injury Epidemiology and Prevention

LCC Subject Category: Medicine: Internal medicine: Medical emergencies. Critical care. Intensive care. First aid | Medicine: Public aspects of medicine

Country of publisher: United Kingdom

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML, ePUB

 

AUTHORS

Tona M. Pitt (Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary)
Alberto Nettel-Aguirre (Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary)
Gavin R. McCormack (Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary)
Andrew W. Howard (Departments of Surgery and Health Policy, Management & Evaluation, University of Toronto)
Camilla Piatkowski (O’Brien Centre for the Bachelor of Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary)
Brian H. Rowe (Department of Emergency Medicine and School of Public Health, University of Alberta)
Brent E. Hagel (Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 13 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Abstract Background Bicycle-related injuries are among the most common recreational injuries for children in Canada; moreover, bicycle-motor vehicle collisions often result in serious injuries. This study seeks to examine environmental, motorist, and bicyclist characteristics of bicycle-motor vehicle collisions that resulted in police reported severe injuries in youth (< 18 years old) bicyclists, in Alberta, Canada. Findings Using Calgary and Edmonton police collision reports, 423 youth bicycle-motor vehicle collisions were identified from 2010 to 2014. Forty-three (10.2%) of these collisions resulted in major/fatal (severe) injuries. These severe injury cases were compared with the 380 youth bicycle-motor vehicle collisions resulting in minor or no injury (controls) using classification tree and logistic regression analyses. There were no driver or bicyclist characteristics with a significant effect on the odds of severe injury to youth bicyclists; however, lower odds were found on each of: divided roads with no barrier (aOR = 0.36; 95% CI: 0.13–0.97) or during peak traffic time (aOR = 0.44; 95% CI: 0.16–0.99). Conclusion Personal and environment characteristics should be considered in future research and interventions focused on reducing severe youth bicycle-motor vehicle collision injuries.