Deoxynivalenol induces structural alterations in epidermoid carcinoma cells A431 and impairs the response to biomechanical stimulation

Scientific Reports. 2018;8(1):1-17 DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-29728-5

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Scientific Reports

ISSN: 2045-2322 (Online)

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

LCC Subject Category: Medicine | Science

Country of publisher: United Kingdom

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML

 

AUTHORS

Giorgia Del Favero (Department of Food Chemistry and Toxicology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna)
Lydia Woelflingseder (Department of Food Chemistry and Toxicology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna)
Lukas Janker (Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna)
Benjamin Neuditschko (Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna)
Stefano Seriani (Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste Via A)
Paolo Gallina (Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste Via A)
Orfeo Sbaizero (Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste Via A)
Christopher Gerner (Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna)
Doris Marko (Department of Food Chemistry and Toxicology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 20 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Abstract Morphology together with the capability to respond to surrounding stimuli are key elements governing the spatial interaction of living cells with the environment. In this respect, biomechanical stimulation can trigger significant physiological cascades that can potentially modulate toxicity. Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) is one of the most prevalent mycotoxins produced by Fusarium spp. and it was used to explore the delicate interaction between biomechanical stimulation and cytotoxicity in A431 cells. In fact, in addition of being a food contaminant, DON is a relevant toxin for several organ systems. The combination between biomechanical stimulation and the mycotoxin revealed how DON can impair crucial functions affecting cellular morphology, tubulin and lysosomes at concentrations even below those known to be cytotoxic in routine toxicity studies. Sub-toxic concentrations of DON (0.1–1 μM) impaired the capability of A431 cells to respond to a biomechanical stimulation that normally sustains trophic effects in these cells. Moreover, the effects of DON (0.1–10 μM) were partially modulated by the application of uniaxial stretching (0.5 Hz, 24 h, 15% deformation). Ultimately, proteomic analysis revealed the potential of DON to alter several proteins necessary for cell adhesion and cytoskeletal modulation suggesting a molecular link between biomechanics and the cytotoxic potential of the mycotoxin.