Mint companion plants attract the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis

Scientific Reports. 2019;9(1):1-8 DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-38098-x

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Scientific Reports

ISSN: 2045-2322 (Online)

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

LCC Subject Category: Medicine | Science

Country of publisher: United Kingdom

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML

 

AUTHORS


Kazuki Togashi (Department of Biological Science & Technology, Faculty of Industrial Science & Technology, Tokyo University of Science)

Mifumi Goto (Department of Biological Science & Technology, Faculty of Industrial Science & Technology, Tokyo University of Science)

Hojun Rim (Department of Biological Science & Technology, Faculty of Industrial Science & Technology, Tokyo University of Science)

Sayaka Hattori (Department of Biological Science & Technology, Faculty of Industrial Science & Technology, Tokyo University of Science)

Rika Ozawa (Center for Ecological Research, Kyoto University)

Gen-ichiro Arimura (Department of Biological Science & Technology, Faculty of Industrial Science & Technology, Tokyo University of Science)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 20 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Abstract Mint plants could theoretically serve as companion plants (CPs) that attract enemies of herbivores in tritrophic interactions. In order to explore the traits of mint volatiles as attractant cues for enemies of two-spotted spider mites, we performed Y-tube olfactometer assays of predatory mites, Phytoseiulus persimilis and Neoseiulus californicus, towards three mint species, apple mint, candy mint, and spearmint, as odor source. Clean candy mint and spearmint were attractive to P. persimilis, when compared with clean air and undamaged Phaseolus vulgaris plants serving as the target crop. Moreover, clean candy mint plants were even more attractive than volatiles from P. vulgaris plants damaged by spider mites. These predator responses were induced additively by candy mint volatiles plus volatiles from damaged P. vulgaris plants, as shown using both Y-tube olfactometer and open-space assay systems. However, the number of spider mite eggs consumed by P. persimilis on P. vulgaris plants did not differ in the presence compared to the absence of mint volatiles, indicating that mint volatiles affect the attraction but not the appetite of P. persimilis. Together, these findings suggest that the use of candy mint and spearmint as CPs is an ideal platform for spider mite pest management via the attraction of predatory mites.