Effect of a Bacterial Grass Culture on the Plant Growth and Disease Control in Tomato

Research in Plant Disease. 2017;23(4):295-305 DOI 10.5423/RPD.2017.23.4.295

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Research in Plant Disease

ISSN: 1598-2262 (Print); 2233-9191 (Online)

Publisher: Hanrimwon Publishing Company

Society/Institution: The Korean Society of Plant Pathology

LCC Subject Category: Agriculture: Agriculture (General)

Country of publisher: Korea, Republic of

Language of fulltext: English, Korean

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML

 

AUTHORS

Yong Seong Lee (Division of Food Technology, Biotechnology and Agrochemistry, Institute of Environmentally-Friendly Agriculture, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea)
KyawWai Naing (Vegetable and Fruit Research and Development Center, Hlegu 11374, Myanmar)
Kil Yong Kim (Division of Food Technology, Biotechnology and Agrochemistry, Institute of Environmentally-Friendly Agriculture, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 18 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

This study aimed to investigate the plant growth-promoting and biocontrol potential of a grass culture with Paenibacillus ehimensis KWN8 on tomato. For this experiment, treatments of a chemical fertilizer (F), a bacterial grass culture (G), a 1/3 volume of G plus 2/3 F (GF), and F plus a synthetic fungicide (FSf) were applied to tomato leaves and roots. The result showed that the severity of Alternariasolani and Botrytiscinerea symptoms were significantly reduced after the application of the bacterial grass culture (G and GF) and FSf. In addition, root mortality in G and GF was lower compared to F. Tomato plants treated with G or GF had better vegetative growth and yield compared to F. Application of G affected the fungal and bacterial populations in the soil. In conclusion, treatment with a bacterial grass culture decreased disease severity and increased tomato growth parameters. However, there were no statistically significant correlations between disease occurrence and tomato yields. This experiment presents the possibility to manage diseases of tomato in an environmentally friendly manner and to also increase the yield of tomato by using a grass culture broth containing P. ehimensis KWN38.