HPV AND CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION

Zdravniški Vestnik. 2018;78(0) DOI 10.6016/ZdravVestn.2732

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Zdravniški Vestnik

ISSN: 1318-0347 (Print); 1581-0224 (Online)

Publisher: Slovenian Medical Association

LCC Subject Category: Medicine

Country of publisher: Slovenia

Language of fulltext: English, Slovenian

Full-text formats available: PDF

 

AUTHORS

Marjetka Uršič-Vrščaj (Onkološki inštitut Ljubljana, Zaloška cesta 2, 1000 Ljubljana)
Milan Bašković (Onkološki inštitut Ljubljana, Zaloška cesta 2, 1000 Ljubljana)
Sonja Bebar (Onkološki inštitut Ljubljana, Zaloška cesta 2, 1000 Ljubljana)
Astrid Djurišić (Onkološki inštitut Ljubljana, Zaloška cesta 2, 1000 Ljubljana)
Vida Stržinar (Onkološki inštitut Ljubljana, Zaloška cesta 2, 1000 Ljubljana)
Aleš Vakselj (Onkološki inštitut Ljubljana, Zaloška cesta 2, 1000 Ljubljana)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Double blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 8 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Background: The causal role of human papilloma virus (HPV) in all cancers of the uterine cervix has been firmly established biologically and epidemiologically. HPV types 16 and 18 account for about 70 % of the cases worldwide. HPV has been recognized as a necessary cause of cervical cancer, meaning that in the absence of the persistent presence of HPV DNA in the cervical cells, cervical cancer will not occur. Thus preventive strategies based on HPV testing in screening programmes or HPV type-specific vaccination are based on solid ground. Most cancers of the vagina and anus are likewise caused by HPV 16, as are a siteable fraction of cancers of the vulva, the penis and the oropharynx. Cervical cancer screening can be a highly effective secondary intervention. In the developing countries these programmes are either not available or are ineffective. HPV vaccination represents the most effective intervention in that scenario. Prophylactic vaccination with human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particle (VPL) vaccines against HPV 16 and HPV 18, has transformed our prospects for reducing the in- cidence of cervical cancer on global scale. HPV vaccines are immunogenic, well tolerated and show remarkable efficacy. Screening will have to continue, as two of the 15 oncogenic HPV types are in the vaccines and for two to three decades at least unvaccinated sexually active women still remain at risk for the disease. Conclusions: If vaccination, screening and HPV testing are combined then the virtual elimination of cervical cancer is possible.