Transplant Research and Risk Management (2020-04-01)

Dietary Supplement Use in Live Kidney Donors and Recipients

  • Persun N,
  • Johnson D,
  • Leonberg-Yoo A,
  • Bahrainwala J,
  • Reese PP,
  • Steiner B,
  • Witmer B,
  • Rashid J,
  • Naji A,
  • Trofe-Clark J

Journal volume & issue
Vol. Volume 12
pp. 9 – 14

Abstract

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Nicole Persun,1 David Johnson,1,2 Amanda Leonberg-Yoo,2,3 Jehan Bahrainwala,2,3 Peter P Reese,2– 4 Brendan Steiner,1 Brooke Witmer,1 Jamal Rashid,1 Ali Naji,2,5 Jennifer Trofe-Clark1– 3 1Department of Pharmacy Services, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Penn Medicine Transplant Institute, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Division of Renal Electrolyte and Hypertension, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USACorrespondence: Jennifer Trofe-ClarkDepartment of Pharmacy Services, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Ground Rhoads Building – Pharmacy Services, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USATel +1 215-614-4274Fax +1 215-615-4900Email [email protected]: Dietary supplement use in living kidney donors (LKDs) and kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) provides care challenges due to drug interactions, limited data, and lack of management guidelines. The study purposes were to describe supplement use patterns and intra/postoperative complications in these populations.Methods: A single-center retrospective review of LKDs and KTRs from September 2016– 2018 was conducted. Supplement information was collected at evaluation and pre-operative visits. Supplement relationship to intra/postoperative complications was graded by Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale.Results: One hundred and fifty-seven LKDs met inclusion with an average age of 45 (SD 11) years. Thirty-seven LKDs (24%) reported supplement use pre-donation. One hundred and eleven KTRs met inclusion with an average age of 46 (SD 13) years and 21 (19%) reported supplement use pre-transplant. No significant differences in sex, ethnicity, or education were found between LKDs or KTRs using supplements vs none. One complication in an LKD was “possibly” related to supplement use vs none in KTRs.Conclusion: Transplant providers should screen for supplement use in LKDs and KTRs at both the evaluation and pre-operative visits and review perioperative management. The low dietary supplement-related intra/post complication rate may be due to discontinuation of supplements preoperatively.Keywords: dietary supplement, living kidney donation, kidney transplantation

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