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‘Seeing’ Strain in Soft Materials

Molecules. 2019;24(3):542 DOI 10.3390/molecules24030542

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Molecules

ISSN: 1420-3049 (Print)

Publisher: MDPI AG

LCC Subject Category: Science: Chemistry: Organic chemistry

Country of publisher: Switzerland

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML

 

AUTHORS


Zhiyong Xia (Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723, USA)

Vanessa D. Alphonse (Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723, USA)

Doug B. Trigg (Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723, USA)

Tim P. Harrigan (Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723, USA)

Jeff M. Paulson (Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723, USA)

Quang T. Luong (Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723, USA)

Evan P. Lloyd (Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723, USA)

Meredith H. Barbee (Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA)

Stephen L. Craig (Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 11 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Several technologies can be used for measuring strains of soft materials under high rate impact conditions. These technologies include high speed tensile test, split Hopkinson pressure bar test, digital image correlation and high speed X-ray imaging. However, none of these existing technologies can produce a continuous 3D spatial strain distribution in the test specimen. Here we report a novel passive strain sensor based on poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) elastomer with covalently incorporated spiropyran (SP) mechanophore to measure impact induced strains. We have shown that the incorporation of SP into PDMS at 0.25 wt% level can adequately measure impact strains via color change under a high strain rate of 1500 s<sup>&#8722;1</sup> within a fraction of a millisecond. Further, the color change is fully reversible and thus can be used repeatedly. This technology has a high potential to be used for quantifying brain strain for traumatic brain injury applications.