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Predictive Mechanisms Are Not Involved the Same Way during Human-Human vs. Human-Machine Interactions: A Review

Frontiers in Neurorobotics. 2017;11 DOI 10.3389/fnbot.2017.00052

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Frontiers in Neurorobotics

ISSN: 1662-5218 (Online)

Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.

LCC Subject Category: Medicine: Internal medicine: Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry

Country of publisher: Switzerland

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML, ePUB, XML

 

AUTHORS


Aïsha Sahaï (Département d'Etudes Cognitives, ENS, EHESS, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut Jean-Nicod, PSL Research University, Paris, France)

Aïsha Sahaï (ONERA, The French Aerospace Lab, Département Traitement de l'Information et Systèmes, Salon-de-Provence, France)

Elisabeth Pacherie (Département d'Etudes Cognitives, ENS, EHESS, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut Jean-Nicod, PSL Research University, Paris, France)

Ouriel Grynszpan (Institut des Systèmes Intelligents et de Robotique, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France)

Bruno Berberian (ONERA, The French Aerospace Lab, Département Traitement de l'Information et Systèmes, Salon-de-Provence, France)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 14 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Nowadays, interactions with others do not only involve human peers but also automated systems. Many studies suggest that the motor predictive systems that are engaged during action execution are also involved during joint actions with peers and during other human generated action observation. Indeed, the comparator model hypothesis suggests that the comparison between a predicted state and an estimated real state enables motor control, and by a similar functioning, understanding and anticipating observed actions. Such a mechanism allows making predictions about an ongoing action, and is essential to action regulation, especially during joint actions with peers. Interestingly, the same comparison process has been shown to be involved in the construction of an individual's sense of agency, both for self-generated and observed other human generated actions. However, the implication of such predictive mechanisms during interactions with machines is not consensual, probably due to the high heterogeneousness of the automata used in the experimentations, from very simplistic devices to full humanoid robots. The discrepancies that are observed during human/machine interactions could arise from the absence of action/observation matching abilities when interacting with traditional low-level automata. Consistently, the difficulties to build a joint agency with this kind of machines could stem from the same problem. In this context, we aim to review the studies investigating predictive mechanisms during social interactions with humans and with automated artificial systems. We will start by presenting human data that show the involvement of predictions in action control and in the sense of agency during social interactions. Thereafter, we will confront this literature with data from the robotic field. Finally, we will address the upcoming issues in the field of robotics related to automated systems aimed at acting as collaborative agents.