Inhaled Corticosteroids in COPD: Determinants of Use and Trends in Patient Persistance with Treatment

Canadian Respiratory Journal. 2004;11(1):27-32 DOI 10.1155/2004/289420

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Canadian Respiratory Journal

ISSN: 1198-2241 (Print); 1916-7245 (Online)

Publisher: Hindawi Limited

LCC Subject Category: Medicine: Internal medicine: Specialties of internal medicine: Diseases of the respiratory system

Country of publisher: United Kingdom

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML, ePUB, XML

 

AUTHORS

Lucie Blais (Centre de recherche, Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM) — Hôtel–Dieu, Canada)
Jean Bourbeau (Respiratory Epidemiology Unit, McGill University, and Montreal Chest Institute, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada)
Odile Dheehy (Centre de recherche, Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM) — Hôtel–Dieu, Canada)
Jacques LeLorier (Centre de recherche, Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM) — Hôtel–Dieu, Canada)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 38 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

METHODS: The determinants of a new treatment with inhaled corticosteroids and secular trends in patient persistence with treatment among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients were investigated. A cohort of 3768 physician-diagnosed, elderly COPD patients was selected between 1990 and 1996 from the health care administrative database of the Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec. A nested case-control design was used to identify patient and physician characteristics that were associated with a new treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. Treatment persistence with inhaled corticosteroids was also estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. In addition to that, changes in treatment persistence over time, from 1990 to 1995, were investigated by estimating the yearly proportion of patients persisting for less than one year.