Chronic fatigue syndrome and quality of life

Patient Related Outcome Measures. 2018;Volume 9:253-262

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Patient Related Outcome Measures

ISSN: 1179-271X (Online)

Publisher: Dove Medical Press

LCC Subject Category: Medicine: Medicine (General)

Country of publisher: United Kingdom

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML

 

AUTHORS


Roberts D

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 16 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Deb Roberts Liverpool CFS Therapy Service, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals, Liverpool, UK Abstract: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), is a challenging long-term condition (LTC) with complex and fluctuating symptoms. It is heterogeneous in presentation without diagnostic indicators; therefore, in health care encounters, insight must be gained from the patient’s perspective. One indicator of impact can be gained by measuring quality of life (QoL). By applying a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM), professionals can gather insights with direct relevance to the patient questioned. Such a tool can act therapeutically tool to promote holistic and individualized professional interventions and interval measurement can inform commissioning of specialist services. Standard practice appears not fully to capture the experience of CFS, while a search of the literature turned up QoL patient-reported outcome tools, but failed to reveal a CFS/ME-specific measure. The author explores a valid and reliable PROM that can monitor change and evaluate the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence rehabilitation program, as delivered by specialist National Health Service units. An alternative, the World Health Organization’s quality-of life instrument (WHOQoL)-Bref26, is reviewed for relevance to the condition, measuring treatment outcomes and the wider debate of measuring QoL in LTCs. Keywords: long-term conditions, patient perspective, assessment, quality of life, measurement