Experiences with Railway Regulation in Great Britain and the Czech Republic – Round Table Report1

Review of Economic Perspectives. 2015;15(4):349-356 DOI 10.1515/revecp-2015-0025

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Review of Economic Perspectives

ISSN: 1804-1663 (Online)

Publisher: Sciendo

Society/Institution: Masaryk University, Faculty of Economics and Administration

LCC Subject Category: Social Sciences: Economic theory. Demography: Economics as a science

Country of publisher: Poland

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF

 

AUTHORS

Nash Chris ( Institute for Transport Studies (ITS), Lifton Villas, 1-3 Lifton Place, University of Leeds)
Tomeš Zdeněk ( Masaryk University, Faculty of Economics and Administration, Department of Economics, Lipová 41a Brno 602 00)
Jandová Monika ( Masaryk University, Faculty of Economics and Administration, Department of Economics, Lipová 41a Brno 602 00)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Double blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 38 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

The aim of the Round Table was to compare British and Czech experiences with railway regulation and competition introduction and to determine which lessons can be learnt. Special attention was paid to the question of whether the very complex British reform can be an inspiration for further liberalisation of the railway sector in the Czech Republic or whether there are any reform mistakes that are best avoided. Based on two introductory presentations and subsequent plenary discussion, some consensus emerged. The participants agreed that there is no one-size-fits-all solution to railway regulation and that the introduction of competition should take into account the different circumstances of a particular country. Franchising in passenger operations in Britain successfully stimulated demand but also increased costs to the industry, so its implementation should be completed with care. It seems very unlikely that open-access competition would be a viable solution for the whole passenger rail market because it is limited to a few commercially attractive routes, and as Czech experience suggests, it creates many new problems. Finally, it was confirmed that a strong and dedicated regulator is needed in a newly liberalised environment in order to solve many emerging conflicts and disputes.