Volatile organic compounds in indoor environment and photocatalytic oxidation: State of the art

Environment International. 2007;33(5):694-705

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Environment International

ISSN: 0160-4120 (Print)

Publisher: Elsevier

LCC Subject Category: Geography. Anthropology. Recreation: Environmental sciences

Country of publisher: United Kingdom

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML

 

AUTHORS


Shaobin Wang (Corresponding author.; Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia)

H.M. Ang (Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia)

Moses O. Tade (Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 12 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the major pollutants in indoor air, which significantly impact indoor air quality and thus influencing human health. A long-term exposure to VOCs will be detrimental to human health causing sick building syndrome (SBS). Photocatalytic oxidation of VOCs is a cost-effective technology for VOCs removal compared with adsorption, biofiltration, or thermal catalysis. In this paper, we review the current exposure level of VOCs in various indoor environment and state of the art technology for photocatalytic oxidation of VOCs from indoor air. The concentrations and emission rates of commonly occurring VOCs in indoor air are presented. The effective catalyst systems, under UV and visible light, are discussed and the kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation is also presented. Keywords: Photocatalytic oxidation, Volatile organic compounds, Indoor air, UV–vis light