Estimation of three-dimensional crustal movements in the 2011 Tohoku-Oki, Japan, earthquake from TerraSAR-X intensity images

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. 2015;15(3):637-645 DOI 10.5194/nhess-15-637-2015

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences

ISSN: 1561-8633 (Print); 1684-9981 (Online)

Publisher: Copernicus Publications

Society/Institution: European Geosciences Union (EGU)

LCC Subject Category: Technology: Environmental technology. Sanitary engineering | Geography. Anthropology. Recreation: Environmental sciences | Science: Geology

Country of publisher: Germany

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, XML

 

AUTHORS

W. Liu (Department of Urban Environment Systems, Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan)
F. Yamazaki (Department of Urban Environment Systems, Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan)
M. Matsuoka (Department of Built Environment, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Japan)
T. Nonaka (Satellite Business Division, PASCO Corporation, Tokyo, Japan)
T. Sasagawa (Satellite Business Division, PASCO Corporation, Tokyo, Japan)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 43 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

The Tohoku-Oki earthquake on 11 March 2011 caused significant widespread crustal movements. In a previous study, we proposed a method for capturing two-dimensional (2-D) surface displacements from a pair of pre- and post-event TerraSAR-X (TSX) intensity images. However, it is impossible to detect three-dimensional (3-D) displacements from one pair of TSX images. In this study, three pairs of pre- and post-event TSX images taken on different paths were used to estimate 3-D crustal movements. The relationship between the actual 3-D displacements and the converted 2-D movements in the synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) images was derived based on the observation model of a SAR sensor. The 3-D movements were then calculated from three sets of detected 2-D movements that occurred within a short time period. Compared with GPS observations, the proposed method was found to be capable of detecting the 3-D crustal movements with sub-pixel accuracy.