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Risk Assessment of Clinical Reactions to Legumes in Peanut-Allergic Children

World Allergy Organization Journal. 2008;1(10):162-167

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: World Allergy Organization Journal

ISSN: 1939-4551 (Online)

Publisher: Elsevier

Society/Institution: World Allergy Organization

LCC Subject Category: Medicine: Internal medicine: Specialties of internal medicine: Immunologic diseases. Allergy

Country of publisher: Netherlands

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML

 

AUTHORS


Louise Bjerremann Jensen (Department of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen; Laboratory of Medical Allergology, Allergy Clinic, National University Hospital, Copenhagen)

Milene Andersen (Allergy Centre, Odense University Hospital, Sdr. Boulevard 29, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark)

Per Stahl Skov (Laboratory of Medical Allergology, Allergy Clinic, National University Hospital, Copenhagen; RefLab ApS, National University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark)

Lars K. Poulsen (Laboratory of Medical Allergology, Allergy Clinic, National University Hospital, Copenhagen)

Carsten Bindslev-Jensen (Reprints:; Allergy Centre, Odense University Hospital, Sdr. Boulevard 29, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Double blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 9 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

Peanut-allergic children might be at risk for reactions to other legumes. However, it is not always possible to perform multiple oral food challenges in children. On the basis of patient case history, in vitro diagnostic tests, and eventually food challenges, we aimed at developing an algorithm for risk assessment of possible clinical reactions to other legumes (soybean, lupine, fresh, and blanched green pea). Seventy-five consecutive patients with a positive oral food challenge to peanut were included in the study. All tests were run as part of the routine allergy examination. A high proportion of patients and/or caretakers refused the administered legume oral food challenges. Obtained diagnoses from histamine release did not correlate significantly to the outcome of the algorithm. Interestingly, threshold from peanut challenges did not correlate with the risk assessment.The algorithm presented in this study can be used when advising peanut-allergic children and their caretakers about what other legumes to avoid in the diet. Keywords: cross-reactivity, histamine release, lupine, oral food challenge, pea, peanut allergy, skin prick test, soy, specific IgE