Medium-Term Effects of a Train Derailment on the Physical and Psychological Health of Men

American Journal of Men's Health. 2019;13 DOI 10.1177/1557988319865363

 

Journal Homepage

Journal Title: American Journal of Men's Health

ISSN: 1557-9883 (Print); 1557-9891 (Online)

Publisher: SAGE Publishing

Society/Institution: Men's Health Network

LCC Subject Category: Medicine

Country of publisher: United States

Language of fulltext: English

Full-text formats available: PDF, HTML

 

AUTHORS

Danielle Maltais (Department of Human and Social Science, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (UQAC), QC, Canada)
Étienne Lavoie-Trudeau (Department of Human and Social Science, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (UQAC), QC, Canada)
Oscar Labra (Department of Human and Social Science, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Rouyn-Noranda, Canada)
Mélissa Généreux (Department of Family Medicine and Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, QC, Canada)
Mathieu Roy (Department of Family Medicine and Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, QC, Canada)
Anne-Lise Lansard (Department of Human and Social Science, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (UQAC), QC, Canada)
Geneviève Fortin (Department of Human and Social Science, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (UQAC), QC, Canada)

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Double blind peer review

Editorial Board

Instructions for authors

Time From Submission to Publication: 15 weeks

 

Abstract | Full Text

In July 2013, the derailment of a train caused the death of 47 people and the destruction of Lac-Mégantic’s downtown area (Canada). Three years after this event, a population survey was conducted among a representative sample of 800 adults, including 282 men. Several significant differences were observed among respondents of a survey based on their level of exposure to this tragedy, including their physical (changes in physical health) and psychological health (post-traumatic stress disorder, mood and anxiety disorders, psychological distress, signs of depression, consultation of social workers and psychologists) as well as their use of prescribed (anxiolytics and antidepressants) and nonprescribed drugs. Such results can be explained by the nature, magnitude, and cause of the event.